You know, because it’s a “phony scandal.” Via The Hill: A top Justice Department official on Thursday brushed aside GOP requests for a special prosecutor to investigate the IRS’s treatment of Tea Party groups, saying the evidence didn’t warrant such a appointment. “It is very, very rare to use a special prosecutor,” Deputy Attorney General […]

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Shocker: DOJ Says No Need For Special Prosecutor In IRS Scandal…

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She’s the Picasso of hacks. Via Roll Call: Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz said the strength of individual candidates will help her party outperform expectations in the upcoming midterms. “Pundits are wildly misinterpreting or over interpreting,” the Florida Democrat said, specifically responding to a projection published by the Washington Post that gives Republicans an 86 […]

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Delusional Loon Wasserman Schultz: Dems Will Pick Up Seats In The House Because of Obamacare’s Popularity…

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Separating Potential Allies from The Enemy

On July 12, 2014, in Barack Obama, Health Care, by RosarioGlenelg

I feel like doing a thumb-sucker on the state of the Republican party today. I was musing yesterday in my head about the need for the establishment and Tea Party elements of the GOP to work together to accomplish positive goals, rather than becoming embroiled in a civil war. It wasn’t long before my mind grew resistant to the idea of cooperating with certain types of establishment people, though. That then led me to distinguish between the types I can see working with, and those I can’t . The people I don’t mind working with are those who believe that constitutional government is a good goal — but who believe that, realistically, the country is not yet ready to go as far as it should. These people argue that we should accomplish what we can, recognize what we can’t accomplish . . . and attempt to persuade people to come around to our point of view on issues where we currently can’t achieve all we would like. The people I have a problem with are those who are contemptuous of Tea Party ideals. Who laugh derisively at the very idea that we should revert to constitutional government. Whose rhetoric is the rhetoric of Big Government and Statism. This includes Republicans in government who seek out Tea Party votes, but (like Thad Cochran) appeal to voters by touting their ability to bring home government benefits. The problem, of course, is distinguishing between the two. Let me provide a couple of examples of pieces I have read lately by pundits who appear to fall into the latter category. Let’s start with Michael Gerson, columnist for the Washington Post , who penned a piece recently titled The tea party risks scaring away voters : The movement has developed a characteristic tone and approach. It is often apocalyptic. The torch of liberty sputters. The country is on the verge of tyranny. Yet, without apparent cognitive dissonance, the movement’s goals are often utopian. The nation’s problems can be solved by passing 10 amendments to the Constitution or by impeaching the president. And those who don’t share a preference for maximal (sometimes delusional) solutions — those who talk of incrementalism or compromise — are granted particular scorn. The tea party temperament is often accompanied by an easily reducible political theory. “The word ‘education,’ ” McDaniel has argued, “is not in the Constitution. Because the word is not in the Constitution, it’s none of their [the federal government’s] business.” Neither are the phrases “health care,” “retirement assistance,” “disaster relief,” “food safety” or “cancer research.” And there goes much of the modern state. These habits of mind — desperation, utopianism, purifying zeal and ideological simplicity — have had their uses throughout history. But they can’t be called conservative. This is one theme of a careful, instructive essay by Philip Wallach and Justus Myers in National Affairs that ought to be required beach reading for conservatives. The authors describe the attributes of the conservative temperament — humility, an appreciation for what is worthy in our society, a preference for incremental reform, a distrust of abstraction — and contrast them with the “misguided radicals of the left and right.” That last paragraph makes Gerson sound like a Burkean conservative: willing to seek smaller government, but preferring incremental approaches. That’s not the type of conservative I am, but I can try to work with people like that — especially when they make it clear that their ideals are substantially the same as mine, but their path for getting there is simply more pragmatic. I understand that point of view. I have held that point of view. I am not contemptuous of it. But look at the second paragraph in the quote above. There, Gerson seems to actively accept “the modern state” in its current form — including, as I interpret his phraseology, a substantial federal role in topics such as “retirement assistance” and even “health care” (!). When he says: “And there goes much of the modern state” my reaction is: “you’re damned right!” But when Gerson says “And there goes much of the modern state” he is saying, as I read his words, that people who want to dismantle the “modern state” are radical and extremist. For people like Gerson, things like Social Security, Medicare, the Education Department, ObamaCare, and the rest of the apparatus of the giant state — all these things are a given. No matter how precipitously they were imposed on us , people like Gerson are worried about doing away with them too hastily, if at all. Better to tinker with them around the margins. But let’s not have any of this crazy talk about how the so-called “Constitution” doesn’t provide a role for federal government interfering in such areas. That sort of talk is Simplistic — why, it’s even Scary. I can’t work with someone who talks like that. I can’t work with someone who, for example, believes that a federal role in health care is “conservative.” To me, that person’s philosophy is pernicious. In some ways, it’s more insidious than the leftist philosophy — because it poses as “conservative” and therefore as a way of thinking that I have to tolerate. Well, I don’t. Such a philosophy is the philosophy of the political enemy . When I say “the political enemy,” I want it to be clear: I do not mean mortal enemy in the sense that Al Qaeda is the “enemy.” But my political enemy is a real opponent . His way of thinking is something that I need to fight with every ounce of energy in my body. I’ll fight it with every ethical means at my disposal . Those means include attempts to persuade — but I will recognize that, more often, persuasion won’t work, and such philosophies must simply be crushed . But I’d like to think that Gerson does not represent a large part of the Republican party. I’d like to think that many people on the right believe in the ultimate goal of limited constitutional government, and that their main disagreement is over how much we can accomplish, and how quickly it needs to be accomplished. I can work with people who disagree with me on such issues. And I invite them to work with people like me. Where there are disagreements, let’s air them, respectfully. But people like Michael Gerson, whether they call themselves “conservative” or not, are the political enemy. And I think those of us who love liberty — all of us — need to identify the enemy for what they are . . . and stamp them out .

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Everything Is Coming Up Cleveland!

On July 12, 2014, in Barack Obama, by m3ed93m

[guest post by Dana] Cleveland scored this week in big news. First, former Cleveland Cavalier and basketball whiz LeBron James announced that he will be leaving the Miami Heat to return to the Cavaliers, the first team he played for in the NBA. “When I left Cleveland, I was on a mission,” James said in the Sports Illustrated first-person story. “I was seeking championships, and we won two. But Miami already knew that feeling. Our city hasn’t had that feeling in a long, long, long time. My goal is still to win as many titles as possible, no question. But what’s most important for me is bringing one trophy back to Northeast Ohio.” Four years ago, fans burned his jersey when he left for Florida, but apparently all is forgiven. For LeBron James, who as an 18 year old signed a 7 year $90 million deal with Nike, life is looking pretty good. He is the favorite son returning home, and on top of that, his Nike LeBron 12 will be hitting the shelves in October, 2014. Price for one pair? $200! Second, it was announced that the 2016 Republican National Convention will be held in Cleveland. Edging out Dallas, Ohio is obviously a key component in the party’s national strategy to win back the White House. The RNC and Cleveland will hammer out the details, with a vote by Republican National Committee members in August. Sen. Rob Portman was the force behind the push for Ohio. Not surprisingly, he has been contemplating a run in 2016 for some time: “I’m not particularly eager to do it myself, and having been involved in six presidential campaigns, I know what it’s like,” he said in a recent interview in his Capitol office. “But if nobody running is able to win and willing to address these issues, then I might have a change of heart.” Portman believes his roots in the swing-state, legislative and executive experience, and support for same-sex marriage (his views on it evolved after finding out his son was gay) would give him an edge in the field as well as garner him the favor of the Republican Party’s establishment. He knows who calls the shots. And, how to win a national election? Well, according to Portman: “To win a national election, we’ve got to work on fixing the Republican brand, and that’s what I’ve been working on,” Portman said. “We’ve got to be the party of ideas, not the party of no. . . . The Democrats have successfully mischaracterized Republicans in many instances, and that’s why Mitt Romney had a tough time winning Ohio. They called him a plutocrat without compassion.” It kind of makes me wish Sin City would have won the bid. At least there would have been, you know, some sin to ease the pain… Much more at the second link. –Dana

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Everything Is Coming Up Cleveland!

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Restraining Order Filed Against Miss. GOP

On July 11, 2014, in Barack Obama, by HanneloWalston

GOP is in bed with the DNC, keeping the status quo in Dee Cee. (HT Angry Mike for the graphic) Via The Hill A conservative election-watching organization has filed a motion for a restraining order against the Mississippi Republican Party, declaring it has evidence of tampering in runoff records. True the Vote, which filed the […]

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Restraining Order Filed Against Miss. GOP

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