The WEEKLY STANDARD podcast with executive editor Fred Barnes on what Presidents Nixon, Reagan, and Clinton had–and President Obama doesn’t.

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Barnes Podcast: What Nixon, Reagan, and Clinton Had–And Obama Doesn’t

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The WEEKLY STANDARD podcast with executive editor Fred Barnes on what Presidents Nixon, Reagan, and Clinton had–and President Obama doesn’t.

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Barnes Podcast: What Nixon, Reagan, and Clinton Had–And Obama Doesn’t

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On (Not) Reading Hillary’s Book

On July 8, 2014, in Barack Obama, by TrinidaHauck

[guest post by JVW] I must say I got a real kick out of reading this blog post in The Washington Post regarding the – ahem, ahem – lackluster sales of Hillary Rodham Clinton’s summer 2014 spellbinder, Hard Choices. I am not familiar with this blogger, Phillip Bump; perhaps he’s a conservative, perhaps he’s a professional contrarian, but he seems surprisingly gleeful at being able to take the piss vinegar out of the once and future inevitable President of the United States. Bump introduces us to an idea called “The Hawking Index” which is a non-scientific way to determine whether readers are really reading a title based upon where in the book are found the most highlights as automatically reported to amazon.com (remember to shop there using the Patterico widget!) by Kindle users. The assumption is that if the most popular highlights come in the first part in the book it can be inferred that readers are abandoning that text without reading all the way through, and that the earlier the most popular highlight appears is an indication that readers aren’t getting too far. I am going to tease you with a hilarious graph displaying the Hawking Index for some well-known titles, but you really ought to read the post to learn the full story. From http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2014/07/07/no-one-is-reading-hard-choices-either/ I think it’s fair to say that not only are fewer people than expected (at least by Simon & Schuster) buying the book, but that the brave souls who plopped out their $15-35 did so out of a weird sense of loyalty to a woman who is a millionaire many times over rather than out of a burning desire to read what she had to say about her disastrous turn as Secretary of State. (And don’t miss Bump’s aside about how many – ahem, ahem – left-wing “intellectuals” are apparently purchasing but not reading Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty.) – JVW

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On (Not) Reading Hillary’s Book

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Lol, there’s not a penny’s worth of difference in full-on lefty-ness between Warren and Clinton, Clinton just lies about it more than does Warren. But I’d love a big fight between the two in the primaries which would show both for the crass nasty folk they are. Via NY Post: President Obama has quietly promised […]

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Report: Obama Has Promised Elizabeth Warren His Support Against Hillary Clinton In 2016

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Jay Carney Clarifies

On July 3, 2014, in Barack Obama, by IWCDeboraydzg

[guest post by Dana] Former White House press secretary Jay Carney reveals a few choice gems as he looks back at his time at the podium… You came to the administration from Time magazine, where, for a while, you covered the White House. How did your view of journalists change when you switched sides? I’m proud of a lot of my work. But if I had known then what I know now, I would have succumbed less often to chasing the same soccer ball down the field that everybody else was. Are you saying they’re shallow? I think the format reinforces a shallow approach. Were you surprised at times how tense things could get with your former colleagues? Sure. It can be surreal at the podium when you go down that front row and you have an exchange with one of the reporters in which there’s very emotional — maybe even theatrical — presentation and back and forth, and then you go to the next reporter and you have the same thing, as if the first one didn’t happen at all. You begin to wonder how valuable a service to the nation that is in the end. Do people in the first row like to showboat? If you look at the difference in tenor between the on-camera briefings and the on-the-record-but-off-camera gaggles, it’s night and day. One serious accusation that has come up throughout your tenure is that this is an Orwellian administration, the most secretive ever. I know — because I covered them — that this was said of Clinton and Bush, and it will probably be said of the next White House. I think a little perspective is useful. What I really reject — and would have rejected as a reporter covering this place — is this notion that whether a reporter is successfully doing his job depends on information he is being handed through the front door from the White House. But won’t all these leak investigations produce a chilling effect? Len Downie [the former Washington Post editor] sat in this office as he was preparing a report about how we were producing a chilling effect, and I was able to take a copy of The Post and drop it on the table and point to yet another unbelievable national security leak. Reporters are still able to get stories and information that the administration clearly does not want them to have. More at the link, including the “asset” that is Joe Biden and his unfiltered mouth. –Dana

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Jay Carney Clarifies

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